Online Training, Politics, Race, Racism, White Privilege

Halloween, Harvey Weinstein, How to Show Up, and More – What We Learned this Week

We say all the time at Point Made Learning that, when it comes to the topics of race, identity, and equity in the U.S., we are subject-matter learners. Not experts. In fact, we think these issues are so complex that the best any of us can hope for is to continue learning. As a team, we consistently challenge one another to stay curious and question our own thinking. That’s because we ask people in our screenings and workshops to do the same thing. So each week, we’d like to share with you what we’ve learned.
What we've learned: collection of books on race and racism
What we’ve learned about race and racism started with these books.

We know there are so many resources available that trying to stay informed can seem overwhelming. That’s why we’re sharing a few select articles and videos that we’ve found insightful as we do our work.

We hope this helps you continue learning, too. And feel free to leave a comment if you think we’ve left anything out!

From Barb Lee

First Person: Sexual Harassers Are Poisonous, and So Are the Companies That Protect Them – IndieWire

This article gets to the institutional power of sexism in the workplace. The author – a friend of mine – points out the pervasive use of non-disclosure agreements and how they silence sexual assault victims.  More than that, they’re designed to protect criminals. Reading this may help people think about ways we misuse power to maintain systemic and institutional racism, too. That’s my hope, at least.

For Guys Reading #MeToo Testimonies – On Being

I like this article because it so aligns with how white people can approach anti-racism work when they first begin. And, it’s just perfect advice for men who are trying to figure what to do with all the news about sexual assault.

Checking My Male Privilege – NY Times

This inspired me to keep doing the work we do.  Charles Blow gets it right.

From Catherine Wigginton Greene

Three Tensions at the Heart of Fighting Racism as a White Person – On Being

I’m a big fan of On Being. In the current climate of never-ending information and opinions, I land on the On Being website and can literally feel my breath slow down. Unlike so much else out there, On Being contributors aren’t adding to the noise just for the sake of being involved in the conversation. Rather, their work is insightful, complex, and questioning. In the piece I’ve linked to above, Courtney E. Martin shares some really helpful suggestions for white people who are trying to interrupt racism. And I suggest anyone interested in exploring some of the bigger questions of our time visit the site regularly.

Ta-Nehisi Coates Schools John Kelly On History Of Civil War And ‘Compromise’

So, I’m all for calling people in (instead of calling them out) so that we can have more constructive dialogue. And I almost always advocate for these types of interactions to happen in-person, not online. BUT! Constructive dialogue is impossible with people in positions of power who use their platform to lie, bully, and defend the indefensible. And in those cases (of which there are way too many these days), we need to speak truth to power. And that’s just what Ta-Nehisi Coates did this week via Twitter in response to John Kelly’s disturbing interpretation of what caused the US Civil War. Read Coates’ mic-drop-worthy, historical takedown of Kelly’s statements. It’s satisfying. But more importantly, you’ll likely learn something about the Civil War that you didn’t know before.

Cultural Appropriation at Halloween: My Culture Is Not a Costume – Teen Vogue

Teen Vogue continues to kill it these days with content that goes deep and hits hard in looking at inequity in American society. I really appreciated this video they released this week. It features young women sharing what it can feel like for them when they see their culture being portrayed in a costume. Use this and our I Wish I Were Black educational video and discussion guides to really get to the heart of cultural appropriation.

From Deionna Wilburn

Swipe my race: ‘If you’re only dating someone for their skin colour, you should consider why’ – The Guardian

Daters gonna date and they should have the right to choose…but in walks racial preference. Does the inclination for one race over another stem from or lead to insensitive stereotypes?  The London-based Swipe My Race video explores how “liking what you like” can be problematic and hurtful for everyone involved.

From Sam Rosenthal

Schools are segregated because white people want them that way – Vox

This powerful interview with MacArthur “genius grant” awardee Nikole Hannah-Jones sheds light on the perspective she brings to her work. Jones’ award-winning reporting on schools and segregation should be read by all Americans who are trying to better understand systemic racism.

Catherine is director of content and engagement for Point Made Learning. She writes, directs, and produces films and oversees the creation of all the products and programming that accompany Point Made’s films so that viewers can connect more deeply with the subject matter.

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